Rear-Facing Down Under

Crash Test Videos

 
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  • Vehicule lap belt crash test w_ child du...
    by rearfacedownunder on February 12, 2015 at 10:49 PM
    3402 Views - 0 Comments

    Vehicule lap belt crash test w_ child dummy-Extreme .... Simulation of 6-year-old Child in ...

  • Vehicule Solution X-fix Booster Crash Te...
    by rearfacedownunder on February 12, 2015 at 10:41 PM
    2973 Views - 0 Comments

    Vehicule Solution X-fix Booster Crash Test_ Back versus Backless- ... Voiture Crash Test ...

  • Importance of proper forward-facing chil...
    by rearfacedownunder on February 12, 2015 at 10:39 PM
    2824 Views - 0 Comments

    Simulated crash tests show the importance of proper child restraint installation. Most parents ...

  • booster lap only - YouTube
    by rearfacedownunder on February 12, 2015 at 10:37 PM
    2297 Views - 0 Comments

    Demonstrates the lap belt vs. lap/shoulder system for booster seats.

  • Crash Simulation. Frontal impact - YouTu...
    by rearfacedownunder on February 12, 2015 at 10:35 PM
    2430 Views - 0 Comments

    ... the consequences of a child slipping his harness in the event of a frontal impact at 30 mph. Visit ...

  • Child Safety Restraints in Crash Test Si...
    by rearfacedownunder on July 5, 2012 at 10:20 AM
    5667 Views - 0 Comments

    Children have poorly developed fragile and flexible neck muscles. When a forward-facing child's heavy head is thrust forward in a crash, the child suffers an enormous amount of stress on neck. If the spinal cord stretches too far in a crash (a mere 6mm) the child may suffer paralysis or death. The young child's cervical vertebrae are not strong enough to protect the spinal cord adequately when forward-facing in a frontal crash. As an example, an average three-year-olds head weighs on average 2.7kg, which means that in an accident at only 50km/h the head weighs 270 kilos! In the event of an impact using a rear-facing child seat the whole of the child's back takes the impact instead of only where the harness touches the body, consequently protecting the much more vulnerable neck, head and spine. The risk of serious injury or fatality has been shown to be five times less while travelling rear-facing.


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