Rear-Facing Down Under

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News, information and educational posts regarding Australian child restraints.

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CORRECTLY using child car seats, booster seats and seatbelts every time SAVES LIVES

Posted on March 27, 2014 at 2:00 AM

The outcome of this crash could have been very different had the occupants not been restrained correctly; an occurrence which is sadly seen on our roads on a regular basis.


According to Kidsafe, more children die from injury in Australia than from cancer and diseases of the nervous system combined.  The MAIN cause of child deaths from unintentional injury in Australia are CAR CRASHES and driveway runovers. Most children who die or are injured in car crashes in Australia, were not properly restrained in the car.

Check your children’s car seats TODAY!


We have all heard that child car seats, booster seats and seatbelts save lives and prevent injuries. However, it is only when child car seats and booster seats are installed correctly and are used correctly that they can effectively do their job of saving lives and preventing injuries in a crash. The same applies to seatbelts.


Buying a car seat or booster seat for your child is one of the most important purchases you will ever make. It has the potential to save their life. Buy a new seat. Don’t risk your child’s life by buying a second hand seat if you don’t know the seat’s history. Only use seats that are less than 10 years old from the date of manufacture to ensure optimum safety in a crash. Destroy all child car seats that have been involved in a crash. They are no longer safe to be used.


Read the instruction manual several times - keep it in a safe place. Follow all instructions exactly. Familiarise yourself with all functions of the seat. Practice installing it in the car and practice fitting a doll into the seat and adjusting the straps BEFORE the birth of your baby. (Infants must use a REAR-FACING car seat). Use the correct seatbelt path. Attach the tether to the anchor point.  If in doubt, visit an authorised installer for advice.
Contact Kidsafe in your State, the ACRI or your local Department of Roads and Transport.


Adjust the harness straps to fit your child snugly over their shoulders and body. This is your child’s safety net in a crash. Loose, twisted straps cannot protect your child in a crash, and can cause severe injuries or ejection from the vehicle. Adjust the seat as the child grows. Raise the harness straps and the headrest (if fitted) to ensure a correct fit. Remove newborn padding and inserts once the child outgrows them. Thick bulky coats and blankets will interfere with the straps and cause them to be too loose. Place coats and blankets OVER the adjusted straps.


Regularly check that your child car seats are installed correctly. Make sure they have not become loose. Check that the tether is correctly attached to the anchor point. Check that the seatbelt has not been accidentally unbuckled.


Rear-facing is the safest way for babies and toddlers to travel. Keep them rear-facing until they outgrow the height or weight limit of the seat. Choose a seat that allows for rear-facing for as long as possible.


Forward-facing children are safest using a child car seat with an in-built harness. Keep them in a seat with an in-built harness until they outgrow the height or weight limit of the seat. Choose a seat that will keep your child in an in-built harness for as long as possible.


Older children are safest using a booster seat which lifts them up to the correct height to ensure the seatbelt fits them correctly. Keep them in a booster seat until they outgrow the height or weight limit of the booster seat. Choose a booster seat that will fit your child for as long as possible. Keep older kids in a booster seat until they can safely pass the Five Step Test to use the adult seatbelt alone.


Children are safest in the back seat of the car. Keep them in the back seat until they are 12 years old or 145cm tall.  Front airbags are deployed at a speed of around 200km/hr. They are designed to protect the largest male adults and can cause serious injuries to small children sitting in the front seat.


Always ensure that seatbelts are worn correctly. The shoulder strap should sit on the strong collar bone between the shoulder and the neck. The lap belt should sit low on the lap across the strong hip bones. The shoulder strap of the seatbelt should NEVER be worn under the arm or behind the back. All passengers should avoid using a lap-only belt as this leaves them with no upper body protection in a crash.


Remember: Seatbelts, airbags and cars are designed to fit adults, not children. This is why child car seats and booster seats are so important to ensure that the crash forces are distributed across the correct areas of a child’s much smaller body.


Accessory H-Harnesses are no longer recommended by safety experts due to the high rate of incorrect usage and high rate of injuries as a result. Keep children in a car seat with an in-built harness for as long as possible, then keep them in a booster seat with the adult seatbelt for as long as possible. H-Harnesses should only be used as a last resort when the only available seatbelt is a lap-only belt, and they should be adjusted correctly for every trip.


Keep your whole family safe, every trip, every time. Buckle up everyone correctly. Safely restrain your pets. Keep an uncluttered car, free from potential projectiles in a crash. Pack mobile phones safely away in a storage compartment, turned off until you reach your destination. Don’t drive distracted. Don’t drive tired. Drive free from alcohol and drugs. Don’t speed. Share the road respectfully with all other road users. Let’s cut the road toll.


Summary of the Australian National Road Rules for Children in Cars


It is the driver’s responsibility to ensure that all passengers and children are correctly restrained. Heavy fines apply for failing to correctly restrain children in motor vehicles. Remember, the road rules are the bare minimum legal requirement. For maximum safety, keep your child in each stage of restraint for as long as they still fit before progressing to the next stage. 
**If your child outgrows their current seat BEFORE the legal age limit, invest in a new seat with higher limits to keep them safely and legally restrained for longer**

What type of seat?

Newborn to 6 months must use a rear-facing seat with in-built harness.
6 months to 4 years must use a rear-facing OR forward-facing seat with in-built harness.
4 years to 7 years must use a seat with an in-built harness OR a booster seat with adult seatbelt.
7 years to 16 years must use a child restraint/booster seat OR a properly fitted adult seatbelt.
Drivers and passengers over 16 years must wear a properly fitted adult seatbelt.

Where can they sit?

Children under 4 years must not sit in the front seat of a vehicle that has 2 or more rows of seats.
Children between 4 years and 7 years must not sit in the front seat of a vehicle that has 2 or more rows of seats UNLESS all the back seats are occupied by younger children.

**In the event that a child between the age of 4 to 7 years needs to use the front seat, they MUST use an untethered booster seat, with the front seat moved back away from the front airbags.  If a passenger over the age of 7 years needs to use the front seat and they do not pass the Five Step Test to use the adult seatbelt alone, they MUST use an untethered booster seat.**

For MAXIMUM safety, go beyond the legal minimums.



Legal does not always equal safe

Posted on January 2, 2014 at 7:25 PM


Legal does not always equal safe.


Just because your child is considered old enough by law to travel without a booster seat, does not mean they will be safe to travel without a booster seat. Children grow at different rates. Reaching a certain age will not guarantee their safety in a crash. An adult seatbelt can cause serious injuries to a child whose body is too small to fit into it properly.


Crash Test. Adult belt is not enough.


Crash Test. Lap only belt with child dummy.


Many countries have legal minimum ages when a child is permitted to travel in the car using just the adult seatbelt alone. In Australia, the legal minimum age for a child to travel in a car without a booster seat is 7 years old. However, many 7 year olds are not yet tall enough to fit into an adult seatbelt alone. The child pictured above is 7.5 years old. Take your child’s individual size into account before taking them out of their booster seat.


Seatbelts are designed for adults over 145cm tall. This is the height of an average 12 year old. The seatbelt is designed to sit on the strong bones of the shoulder and hips. The body of a child is too small to fit correctly into an adult seatbelt alone. The lap belt will cut into their soft abdomen and the shoulder belt will cut across their neck. A young child can “submarine” under the lap belt. The child will often place the shoulder belt under their arm or behind their back. This puts the child at risk of sustaining serious, head, neck, spinal and internal injuries in the event of a collision. Children are safest using a child restraint or booster seat suited to their age and size until they can pass the Five Step Test to safely use an adult seatbelt alone. Do not move your child out of their booster seat until they can pass all five steps:


Five Step Test.


1. Can the child sit up straight with their back flat against the vehicle seat?

2. Do the child’s knees bend at the edge of the vehicle seat?

3. Does the lap belt sit low on the hips and thighs?

4. Does the shoulder belt sit between the shoulder and neck?

5. Can the child sit up properly, wearing the seatbelt properly for the entire trip?


Booster seats lift the child up to the correct level so that the vehicle seatbelt sits properly on the strong bony parts of their body. Booster seats also provide side impact protection in the event of a side collision.


Apart from the obvious safety benefits, booster seats give children a better view out the side windows, they provide head support when the child sleeps, and they help to keep the child sitting in the correct position. Booster seats are for big kids. Keep them in a booster seat for as long as they still fit, and until they are tall enough to safely fit the adult seatbelt correctly.


Booster seats are designed for children over the age of 4, who have completely outgrown child restraints with an in-built harness. The legal minimum in Australia for a child to use a booster seat with the adult seatbelt is 4 years old. Children under the age of 4 must use a child restraint with an in-built harness (not an add-on H-Harness). If a child outgrows a 0-4 years seat before the age of 4, a convertible booster seat with an in-built (not add-on) harness is recommended to be used for as long as the child still fits. Keep your child in each stage of seat for as long as they fit. Early graduation to the next stage of seat is a step down in safety and puts the child at higher risk of sustaining injuries in a crash.


And remember, keep children in the back seat of the car for as long as possible, preferably up to the age of 12. The front airbags are deployed at a speed of around 200km/hr. Small children sitting in the front seat are at risk of sustaining serious injuries in a motor vehicle crash when an airbag is deployed directly at their face and head. Children are safest sitting in the back seat until they are at least 12 years old and over 145cm tall. If a child over the age of 4 needs to use the front seat because all back seats are occupied by younger children in child restraints, it is recommended that they use an un-tethered booster seat with the front seat moved back away from the airbags.


Video: When Can Kids Sit in the Front Seat?


According to Kidsafe Australia, more children die from injury in Australia than from cancer and diseases of the nervous system combined.  The MAIN cause of child deaths from unintentional injury in Australia are CAR CRASHES and DRIVEWAY RUNOVERS. Most children who die or are injured in car crashes in Australia, were not properly restrained in the car.


Crash Test. Danger of placing shoulder belt under the arm.


Crash Test. Booster lap only belt.


Video: Proper fit for regular seatbelt.


Video: Seatbelts are designed for adults.


Video: How a seatbelt can injure a child.


For MAXIMUM safety, go beyond the legal minimums.


Video: Australian Road Rules Child Restraints.


Kidsafe Child Restraint Guidelines.



The importance of keeping children under 12 in the back seat of the car

Posted on December 23, 2013 at 11:40 PM

The importance of keeping children under 12 in the back seat of the car.

 

The front seat of a car is designed for adults, not children. The seatbelts are designed to protect people over 145cm tall. The front airbags are designed to protect an average adult male of 75kg and 180cm tall. In order to protect the biggest males, an airbag is deployed at a speed of around 200km/hr. The smallest adult female dummy used to test front airbags is around 150cm tall. This is the height of an average 12 year old child. Small children sitting in the front seat are at risk of sustaining serious injuries in a motor vehicle crash when an airbag is deployed directly at their face and head. This increases the risk of injuries to their head and neck. Children are safest sitting in the back seat until they are at least 12 years old and over 145cm tall.


 Video: When can kids sit in the front seat?

 

Whilst the law allows children over the age of 7 to sit in the front seat, the injury risk to children under the age of 12 is nearly double in the front seat compared to the back seat. Children under 12 in the front seat are at greater risk of serious injury and death than adults due to front airbag deployment.


Kidsafe Guidelines: Keep Children Under 12 in the Back Seat


When sitting in the back seat, it is important that children are correctly restrained. Seatbelts are also designed for adults over 145cm tall. A small child using an adult seatbelt will slouch, causing the lap part of the belt to ride up onto their soft abdomen and the shoulder part of the belt to cut across their neck. The child will often place the shoulder belt under their arm or behind their back. The child is now at risk of sustaining serious, head, neck, spinal and internal injuries in the event of a collision. Children are safest using a child restraint or booster seat suited to their age and size until they can pass the Five Step Test to safely use an adult seatbelt alone. Do not move your child out of their booster seat until they can pass all five steps:


Five Step Test

 

1. Can the child sit up straight with their back flat against the vehicle seat?

2. Do the child’s knees bend at the edge of the vehicle seat?

3. Does the lap belt sit low on the hips and thighs?

4. Does the shoulder belt sit between the shoulder and neck?

5. Can the child sit up properly, wearing the seatbelt properly for the entire trip?


Crash Test: Adult belt is not enough

Crash Test: Lap only belt with child dummy

Crash Test: Booster seat lap only belt

Crash Test: Booster seat shoulder belt under arm

 

Recap of the Australian Road Rules:

 

It is the driver’s responsibility to ensure that all passengers and children are correctly restrained. Heavy fines apply for failing to correctly restrain children in motor vehicles. Remember, the road rules are the bare minimum legal requirement. For optimum safety, keep your child in each stage of restraint for as long as they still fit before progressing to the next stage.

 

Newborn to 6 months must use a rear-facing seat with in-built harness.

6 months to 4 years must use a rear-facing OR forward-facing seat with in-built harness.

4 years to 7 years must use a seat with an in-built harness OR a booster seat with adult seatbelt.

7 years to 16 years must use a child restraint/booster seat OR a properly fitted adult seatbelt.

Drivers and passengers over 16 years must wear a properly fitted adult seatbelt.

Children under 4 years must not sit in the front seat of a vehicle that has 2 or more rows of seats.

Children between 4 years and 7 years must not sit in the front seat of a vehicle that has 2 or more rows of seats UNLESS all the back seats are occupied by younger children.

 

**In the event that a child between the age of 4 to 7 years needs to use the front seat, they MUST use an untethered booster seat, with the front seat moved back away from the front airbags. If a passenger over the age of 7 years needs to use the front seat and they do not pass the Five Step Test to use the adult seatbelt alone, they MUST use an untethered booster seat.**


For MAXIMUM safety, go beyond the legal minimums.


Video: Australian Road Rules Child Restraints

Kidsafe Child Restraint Guidelines 

Video: Proper fit for regular seatbelt

Video: Seatbelts are designed for adults

Video: How a seatbelt can injure a child




The Importance of correct strap placement

Posted on December 23, 2013 at 11:15 PM

The Importance of correct strap placement.


The in-built harness straps on your child’s car seat are your child’s safety net in a car crash. If the straps are not positioned correctly over the child’s shoulders, straight and snug, they CANNOT do their job of keeping your child safe in a crash. You wouldn’t jump onto a safety net that wasn’t secured correctly, so you cannot expect your child to be protected by straps that are not positioned correctly.


In the event of a car crash, everything inside the car that is not restrained is thrown violently forwards upon impact. The harness straps are designed to prevent your child’s body from hitting objects within the car or from being thrown from the car.

 

If a child takes their arms out of the straps, this leaves them with NO upper body support in a crash. Their upper body would fly forwards, their head hitting the front seat, the door or even the roof. They would be at risk of head injuries, spinal injuries and internal injuries. In a worst case scenario, the child could also be ejected from the car.


Crash Test: Arms out of harness straps

 

Loose and twisted straps cannot protect a child effectively in a crash. With the straps too loose, the child will be subjected to too much forward movement of the upper body and head. The straps can slip off the shoulders, rendering them useless. Twisted straps will not distribute the crash forces evenly, thus causing too much pressure on the child’s delicate body.


Crash Test: Correct VS incorrect strap placement and installation


Crash Test: Tight harness straps VS loose harness straps 


Crash Test: Correct harness slots VS incorrect harness slots 


The harness straps are designed to be worn straight and snug over the child’s shoulders and buckled in correctly on EVERY trip, no exceptions. Combined with a correctly installed seat, your child will have the best chance of surviving a car crash without sustaining life threatening or fatal injuries. To check that the straps are snug enough, you should not be able to pinch them vertically between your thumb and forefinger at the collar bone. Bulky clothing or thick coats should NOT be worn under the harness straps as this will leave the straps too loose in a crash. Blankets or coats should be placed OVER the top of the tightened straps for warmth in colder months.


Video: Danger of winter coats in car seats

 

Rear-facing is the safest way for young children to travel for as long as possible. It provides the gentlest way for them to ride down a crash and protects their immature, developing skeleton, heavy head and spine.  


Crash test: Rear-facing VS forward-facing & incorrect seatbelt placement


Forward-facing convertible booster seats with an in-built (not add-on) harness are best suited for OLDER children who have completely outgrown 0-4 years rear-facing/forward-facing car seats. The in-built harness straps provide better protection to children who are still too small and immature to use a booster seat with an adult seatbelt. When worn correctly the in-built harness spreads the forces of the crash to the child’s stronger bony parts of the skeleton (the shoulders and hips), rather than the soft abdominal area which can occur when small children use an adult seatbelt that is too big for their body.

 

Children MUST use a car seat with an in-built (not add-on) harness until they are 4 years old at the very MINIMUM. Keep children in a car seat with an in-built harness (not add-on) for as long as they still fit, even over the age of 4, to give them better protection in a crash.


Video: Australian Road Rules Child Restraints

 

To calculate the crash forces on unrestrained objects, multiply the weight of the object by the speed travelled at the time of the collision. So an unrestrained 20kg child, travelling at 60km/hr would become a 1200kg (1.2 Tonne) missile in a crash.


Correct shoulder strap postion for Australian child restraints:


For rear-facing, the harness straps should be positioned in the slots at or slightly above your child’s shoulders and never below their shoulders.


For forward-facing, the harness straps should be positioned in the slots nearest your child’s shoulders, but not more than 2.5cm above or below their shoulders.


https://www.researchgate.net/publication/38065159_Accessory_child_safety_harnesses_Do_the_risks_outweigh_the_benefits" target="_blank">H-Harnesses no longer recommended study





The Importance of Booster Seats

Posted on December 23, 2013 at 10:50 PM

The Importance of booster seats.

 

Vehicle seats and seatbelts are designed for adult sized bodies over 145cm tall. The seatbelt is designed to sit on the strong bones of the shoulder and hips. When a child uses the vehicle seat and seatbelt alone, their legs are too short to bend at the edge of the seat, causing the child discomfort. They slouch to overcome this. This slouching causes the lap belt to ride up onto their soft abdominal area. The slouching in turn causes the shoulder belt to cut across their neck, again causing discomfort. To overcome this, they often put the shoulder belt behind their back or under their arm. The child is now at risk of sustaining internal abdominal injuries, head, neck and spinal injuries in the event of a motor vehicle collision. Booster seats lift the child up to the correct level so that the vehicle seatbelt sits properly on the strong bony parts of their body. Booster seats also provide side impact protection in the event of a side collision.


Crash Test: adult belt is not enough

Crash Test: lap only belt with child dummy

Crash Test: booster with lap only belt

Crash Test: booster with shoulder belt under the arm

Video: When Can Kids Sit in the Front Seat?


Apart from the obvious safety benefits, booster seats give children a better view out the side windows, they provide head support when the child sleeps, and they help to keep the child sitting in the correct position. Booster seats are for big kids. Keep them in a booster seat for as long as they still fit, and until they are tall enough to safely fit the vehicle seat and adult seatbelt correctly. No matter what age they are.


Children are safest using a child restraint or booster seat suited to their age and size until they can pass the Five Step Test to safely use an adult seatbelt alone. Do not move your child out of their booster seat until they can pass all five steps:

 

Five Step Test.

 

1. Can the child sit up straight with their back flat against the vehicle seat?

2. Do the child’s knees bend at the edge of the vehicle seat?

3. Does the lap belt sit low on the hips and thighs?

4. Does the shoulder belt sit between the shoulder and neck?

5. Can the child sit up properly, wearing the seatbelt properly for the entire trip?


Booster seats are designed for children over the age of 4, who have completely outgrown child restraints with an in-built harness. Children under the age of 4 must use a child restraint with an in-built harness. If a child outgrows a 0-4 years seat before the age of 4, a convertible booster seat with an in-built (not add-on) harness is recommended to be used for as long as the child still fits. Keep your child in each stage of seat for as long as they fit. Early graduation to the next stage of seat is a step down in safety and puts the child at higher risk of sustaining injuries in a crash.


For MAXIMUM safety, go beyond the legal minimums.






Kidsafe National Child Restraint Guidelines

Posted on December 11, 2013 at 1:10 AM

On 22 October 2013, Kidsafe Australia and Neuroscience Research Australia released their National Child Restraint Guidelines for the safe restraint of children travelling in motor vehicles.


The TEN ESSENTIAL STEPS to the guidelines are as follows:

1. The Use of any restraint is preferable to not using a restraint. It is the law that each person in a motor vehicle has their own restraint.


2. Infants are safest if they remain in their rear facing restraint as long as they still fit in their rear facing restraint. While the law allows children over 6 months to use either a rear facing restraint or a forward facing restraint, the rear facing restraint offers better protection as long as the child fits in it.


3. Once a child is too tall for their rear facing child restraint, they should use a forward-facing child restraint (with built-in 6 point harness) until they are too tall for it. While the law allows children 4 years and older to use either a forward-facing child restraint or a booster seat, the forward-facing child restraint offers better protection as long as the child fits in it.


4. Once a child is too tall for a forward facing child restraint, they should use a booster seat with a lap-sash seat belt until they are tall enough to fit properly into an adult seat belt. While the law allows children 7 years and older to use either a booster seat or a seat belt by itself, a booster seat offers better protection as long as the child fits in it.


5. For a child in a booster seat or an adult seatbelt, use a seating position with a lap-sash (lap and shoulder) belt in preference to one with a lap-only belt.


6. All child restraints and booster seats must be installed correctly and the child strapped in correctly, according to the manufacturer’s instructions:


a) Always use a top tether strap for all rearward facing child restraints, forward facing child restraints and booster seats that have them.


b) Always thread the seatbelt through the correct path (following the colour coding available for newer restraints).


c) Ensure there is no slack or looseness in any part of the system. Check the harness straps around the child, the top tether, the seatbelt anchoring the restraint to the vehicle, and the seatbelt used by a child in a booster seat.


d) Check that the seat belt is buckled before each trip.


7. Children 12 years of age and under are safest in the rear seat.


8. Seat belts should never be used with the sash belt under the child’s arm or behind the child’s back, whether they are being used alone or with a booster seat.


9. When planning any journey with children, use a motor vehicle which allows each child to be in the appropriate restraint for their size.


10. Regularly check that child restraints are correctly installed and that the restraint is adjusted properly for the child's size according to the restraint users' manual. Using a restraint fitting service will help ensure that everything is used correctly and that your child is as safe as possible.

2013 Revised Australian Standard for Child Restraints in Motor Vehicles

Posted on December 9, 2013 at 5:00 PM

On 7 June 2013, the Revised Australian Standard  for Child Restraint Systems for use in Motor Vehicles (AS/NZS 1754:2013) was announced by Standards Australia. 

AS/NZS 1754:2013


** Please note that the 2013 Child Restraint Standard was mandated by the ACCC on 19 September 2014, allowing new categories of seats to be sold in Australia.**


Child restraint type designations under this new standard are as follows:


Type A1:


Rearward-facing restraint with in-built harness suitable for infants up to 70cm in length and approximately 6 months of age.  (Dummies: 6 weeks, 9 months)


Type A1/0:


Rearward-facing restraint with in-built harness suitable for infants of low birth weight up to 70cm in length and approximately 6 months of age.  (Dummies: Prem, 6 weeks, 9 months)


Type A2:


Rearward-facing restraint with in-built harness suitable for infants up to 80cm in length and approximately 12 months of age.  (Dummies: 6 weeks, 18 months)


Type A2/0:


Rearward-facing restraint with in-built harness suitable for infants of low birth weight up to 80cm in length and approximately 12 months of age.  (Dummies: Prem, 6 weeks, 18 months)


Type A3:


Sidewards installed restraint with in-built harness suitable for infants up to 70cm in length and approximately 6 months of age.  (Dummies: 6 weeks, 9 months)


Type A3/0:


Sidewards installed restraint with in-built harness suitable for infants of low birth weight up to 70cm in length and approximately 6 months of age.  (Dummies: Prem, 6 weeks, 9 months)


Type A4:


Rearward-facing restraint with in-built harness suitable for a child of approximately 30 months of age. (Dummies: 6 weeks, 9 months, 18 months, 3 years)


Type A4/0:


Rearward-facing restraint with in-built harness suitable for infants of low birth weight for a child of approximately 30 months of age.  (Dummies: Prem, 6 weeks, 9 months, 18 months, 3 years)


Type B:


Forward-facing chair with in-built harness suitable for children approximately 6 months to 4 years of age. (Dummies: 9 months, 3 years, 6 years)


Type C1:


Forward-facing harness to be used in conjunction with a booster seat suitable for children approximately 4 to 10 years of age depending on whether the booster seat is Type E or Type F.  (Dummies: 6 years, 10 years plus extra weight)


Type C2:


Forward-facing harness with out chair suitable for children approximately 7 to 10 years of age used with just the vehicle seat and seatbelt but not suitable for use with a booster seat.  (Dummies: 6 years, 10 years plus extra weight)


Type D:


Rearward-facing chair with in-built harness suitable for children from approximately 6 months to 4 years of age.  (Dummies: 9 months, 3 years, 6 years)


Type E:


A booster seat used in conjunction with a lap-sash seatbelt suitable for children approximately 4 to 8 years of age whose height is less than 128cm. May also be used in conjunction with seatbelt and a Type C1 child harness.  (Dummies: 3 years, 6 years, 10 years)


Type F:


A booster seat used in conjunction with a lap-sash seatbelt suitable for children approximately 4 to 10 years of age whose height is less than 138cm. May also be used in conjunction with seatbelt and a Type C1 child harness.  (Dummies: 3 years, 6 years, 10 years plus extra weight)


Type G:


Forward-facing chair with in-built harness suitable for children approximately 6 months to approximately 8 to 10 years of age.  (Dummies: 9 months, 3 years, 6 years, 10 years plus extra weight)


Type H:


A converter used with a booster seat suitable for children approximately 4 to 7 years of age and/or used with a seatbelt without a booster seat approximately 7 to 10 years of age.  (Dummies: 3 years, 6 years, 10 years plus extra weight with booster, and 6 years and 10 years plus extra weight without booster)



CRASH TEST DUMMIES USED TO TEST AUSTRALIAN CHILD RESTRAINTS


Name Age Weight


LBW Low birth weight/Premature   2kg

TARU Theresa 6 weeks   4kg

TNO P3/4 9 months   9kg

TNO P1 1/2 18 months   11kg (extra weight to 12kg)

TNO P3 3 years 15kg

TNO P6 6 years 22kg

TNO P10 10 years 32kg (extra weight to 36kg)

Isofix Approved For Use In Australia

Posted on December 1, 2013 at 10:50 PM

On 7 June 2013, Standards Australia confirmed that the latest revision of the joint Australian and New Zealand Standard, AS/NZS 1754:2013, will allow the use of child restraints featuring ISOFIX-compatible lower attachment connectors, which attach to ISOFIX low anchorages in the vehicle as an alternative to using the vehicle seatbelt.


Only ISOFIX-compatible child restraints which meet the Australian Standard will be approved for use within Australia.  


The system features vehicle ISOFIX low anchorages and either rigid or flexible lower attachment connectors on the child restraints.  This system for securing the child restraint to the vehicle will continue to require the use of an upper tether strap which has been required for Australian child restraints since the Standard was first established in 1975.


Not all vehicles have ISOFIX low anchorages.  Therefore, Australian ISOFIX-compatible child restraints will also be capable of being installed using the vehicle seatbelt.


Australian ISOFIX-compatible child restraints will only be available for rearward-facing and forward-facing seats (Types A, B & D) with an in-built harness suitable for children up to 4 years of age.  Convertible booster seats and booster seats (Types E, F & G) for older, heavier children will not be ISOFIX-compatible, due to possible insufficient strength of the ISOFIX low anchorages.


** Please note that the 2013 Child Restraint Standard was mandated by the ACCC on 19 September 2014, allowing new categories of seats to be sold in Australia.**


For more information on ISOFIX-compatible child restraints in Australia, please click the links below:


Standards Australia Media Release

CREP Australia explains Isofix system

ISOFIX child restraint system approved for use in Australia

ISOFIX child car seats finally approved for Australia

Standards Australia revision now allows for ISOFIX child restraints




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